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Quality Instrumentation for the Life Sciences

Webinars

PP Systems offers webinars highlighting some of the important research our customers are performing. Please sign up below if a topic is of interest to you. Would you like to be notified of upcoming webinars? Simply provide your name and email below and we will be happy to notify you!

Handy PEA+

Join Dr. Robison and chase electrons through PSII during early cold stress in soybean using the Handy PEA+ system.

  • Learn how to interpret fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction curves
  • Step-by-step parameter analysis beyond Fv/Fm

Cold Chasing Electrons: Dissection of early cold-induced deficiency in soybean

Presented by Jennifer Robison, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology, Manchester University

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About Dr. Robison

Jennifer Robison, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Biology at Manchester University. She has been teaching undergraduates for over a decade. Her research specializes in the physiological and molecular response of plants to abiotic stress. Outside of the lab, she is a single mom and amateur glassblower.

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Past Webinars

CO2 Efflux in Four Compost Windrows: Understanding how to minimize the loss of carbon through emissions during the compost maturation process | 05.20.21

Presented by Travis Pennell with Louis-Pierre Comeau, Ph.D.

Learn what the Comeau Lab at the Fredericton Research and Development Centre has learned by measuring carbon flux and organic carbon, focusing on four windrows that represented the two main compositions found on the site: solid-state organic waste and mixed industrial waste from local businesses. This important research contributes to a broader understanding of how to minimize the loss of carbon through emissions during the compost maturation process

About Travis Pennell & Dr. Comeau

Travis holds a BSc in Environment & Natural Resource Management from the University of New Brunswick (UNB). He has worked with Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) since the project began last summer and continues to work with researchers and instructors at UNB to further pursue his interest in soil science and soil management. He is also involved in a smaller project focused on mapping soil compaction in heavily disturbed areas and has been a teaching assistant for the introductory soil science course at UNB.

Dr. Louis-Pierre Comeau is a research scientist with the Federal Government of Canada. His research is focused on landscape and soil carbon – specifically investigating ways to replenish soil organic matter from agricultural and forest lands.

Dr. Comeau collaborates in initiatives to protect soil health from the effect of global warming and climate change and leads national projects that investigate the relationship between soil biodiversity and carbon storage as well as projects on compost optimization. His long-term scientific goal is to contribute knowledge as to why some carbon molecules remain stable in the soil for thousands of years.

Dr. Comeau is now working on a ground-breaking Canadian soil mapping project which is the first of its kind in Canada. The main goal of the endeavor is to pull all of the results from broad soil carbon and biodiversity surveys together with the use of supercomputers to create detailed maps of what he calls the soil universe.

Dr. Comeau began his Research Scientist appointment with AAFC after his postdoctoral fellowship at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Dr. Comeau previously completed a B.Sc. in Biology at the National Autonomous University of Mexico; an M.Sc. in Soil Science at the University of Saskatchewan; and a PhD. in soil Science at the University of Aberdeen UK (with the fieldwork done in Indonesian forests).

Cyanobacteria & Microalgae In Situ Determination with the bbe AlgaeTorch | 04.29.21

Presented by Tobias Boehme Ph.D. & Detlev Lohse, Ph.D.

  • Learn about the benefits and use of the bbe AlgaeTorch for in situ determination of cyanobacteria and microalgae.
  • Topics covered include: About phytoplankton, algae determination & chlorophyll, advanced fluorometry, algaeTorch features & handling, application field measurement & guidelines

About Dr. Boehme & Dr. Lohse

Dr. Boehme’s background is in physics and oceanography. Today he is involved in several research projects in the field of holographic detection of algae and is focused on developing new and innovative algae devices as well as instrument installation and integration for bbe Moldaenke and is a frequent speaker on the topic of HAB.

Dr. Lohse studied biochemistry at the University of Hannover, Germany, and received his Ph.D. from the University of Düsseldorf in 1986. He spent more than ten years in fundamental research specializing in plant biochemistry. For the last 22 years, Detlev’s focus has been on knowledge transfer regarding photosynthetic processes and algal pigments.

Four methods of measuring mesophyll conductance with the CIRAS-3 Portable Photosynthesis System | 04.15.21

Presented by James Bunce, Ph.D.

Learn the four independent methods of measuring mesophyll conductance in leaves of C3 plants using the CIRAS-3 portable photosynthesis system as well as the advantages, disadvantages, and how to program the CIRAS-3 for each method, as well as the measurement and data analysis steps needed for each method.

About Dr. Bunce

Dr. James Bunce built his first photosynthesis system as a graduate student 48 years ago and has been performing leaf gas exchange measurements ever since.

He has 40 years of research experience with the USDA Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville, Maryland as an environmental plant physiologist. His focus has been on photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and plant water relations and their response and acclimation, in the context of plant adaptation to the environment, most recently adaptation to the global change factors of rising carbon dioxide concentration and temperature.

Step-by-step automated tracking of diurnal patterns of leaf gas exchange in the field with the CIRAS-3 Portable Photosynthesis System | 02.24.21

Presented by James Bunce, Ph.D.

Learn how quick and easy it is to record diurnal patterns of leaf gas exchange with the CIRAS-3 as well as Dr. Bunce’s best practices for long-duration, unattended operation in the field.

About Dr. Bunce

Dr. James Bunce built his first photosynthesis system as a graduate student 48 years ago and has been performing leaf gas exchange measurements ever since.

He has 40 years of research experience with the USDA Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville, Maryland as an environmental plant physiologist. His focus has been on photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and plant water relations and their response and acclimation, in the context of plant adaptation to the environment, most recently adaptation to the global change factors of rising carbon dioxide concentration and temperature.

The SBA-5 CO2 Gas Analyzer: A Key Component for Researchers Monitoring & Understanding Degassing Processes at Active Volcano Sites
| 11.18.20

Presented by John Stix, Ph.D., Maarten J. de Moor, Ph.D. & Jessica Salas

Learn how the SBA-5 CO2 Gas Analyzer is relied upon as a key component for researchers monitoring and understand degassing processes at active volcano sites by some of the most renowned researchers in the area of volcanology.

About Dr. Stix, Dr. de Moor & Jessica Salas

John Stix is a professor of volcanology at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. He holds the William Dawson Chair in Geology. He has worked on active volcanic systems since 1989, with a focus on volcanic gases, supervolcanoes, and subsurface magma plumbing systems. He is the past Editor-in-Chief of the Bulletin of Volcanology, the premier journal in its field. He and his group are continually searching for novel and exciting ways to study active volcanoes and their impacts.

Dr. Maarten de Moor is a volcanologist focusing on using gas geochemistry to understand volcanic processes and evaluate volcanic activity. He is based at the Observatory of Volcanology and Seismology in Costa Rica at the National University and uses in-situ instrumentation at active volcanoes to show that significant short-term variations in key gas ratios (CO2/SO2, H2S/SO2) accompany, and in some cases precede, eruptive activity. Real-time gas data thus provide insights into eruptive processes and show great potential for forecasting dangerous volcanic eruptions.

Jessica is a chemist and Master’s candidate in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at McGill University. Prior to joining McGill, she was a research assistant at the Costa Rican volcano observatory where she became interested in geochemical research, monitoring volcanic activity, and science communication. Currently, she works with Dr. Stix and Dr. de Moor to design a new version of a Multi-GAS, an instrument capable of real-time field measurements of volcanic gas concentration.

Photosynthetic Responses to Brief High and Low Temperature Events in Crops Grown at Ambient and Elevated CO2 | 10.30.20

Presented by James Bunce, Ph.D.

Presented at the 1st Brazilian Symposium on Photosynthesis on October 30, 2020.

About Dr. Bunce

Dr. James Bunce built his first photosynthesis system as a graduate student 48 years ago and has been performing leaf gas exchange measurements ever since.

He has 40 years of research experience with the USDA Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville, Maryland as an environmental plant physiologist. His focus has been on photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and plant water relations and their response and acclimation, in the context of plant adaptation to the environment, most recently adaptation to the global change factors of rising carbon dioxide concentration and temperature.

The Benefits of Algae class Differentiation to Acquire Information About the In-situ Algae Class In Open Waters | 10.22.20

Presented by Tobias Boehme Ph.D. & Detlev Lohse, Ph.D.

  • General overview of the FluoroProbe instrument for depth profiling in the field
  • Optional accessories including WorkStation 25 for laboratory sampling
  • Method of the bbe instruments (Fingerprint simulation will be presented)
  • Using live algae for calibration of Fingerprints (importance compared to other manufacturers that use dye solutions for calibration)
  • Data presentation of the FluoroProbe. Depth dependence of Cyanobacteria.

About Dr. Boehme & Dr. Lohse

Dr. Boehme’s background is in physics and oceanography. Today he is involved in several research projects in the field of holographic detection of algae and is focused on developing new and innovative algae devices as well as instrument installation and integration for bbe Moldaenke and is a frequent speaker on the topic of HAB.

Dr. Lohse studied biochemistry at the University of Hannover, Germany, and received his Ph.D. from the University of Düsseldorf in 1986. He spent more than ten years in fundamental research specializing in plant biochemistry. For the last 22 years, Detlev’s focus has been on knowledge transfer regarding photosynthetic processes and algal pigments.

The Benefits of Algae class Differentiation to Acquire Information About the In-situ Algae Class In Open Waters | 10.22.20

Presented by Tobias Boehme Ph.D. & Detlev Lohse, Ph.D.

  • General overview of the FluoroProbe instrument for depth profiling in the field
  • Optional accessories including WorkStation 25 for laboratory sampling
  • Method of the bbe instruments (Fingerprint simulation will be presented)
  • Using live algae for calibration of Fingerprints (importance compared to other manufacturers that use dye solutions for calibration)
  • Data presentation of the FluoroProbe. Depth dependence of Cyanobacteria.

About Dr. Boehme & Dr. Lohse

Dr. Boehme’s background is in physics and oceanography. Today he is involved in several research projects in the field of holographic detection of algae and is focused on developing new and innovative algae devices as well as instrument installation and integration for bbe Moldaenke and is a frequent speaker on the topic of HAB.

Dr. Lohse studied biochemistry at the University of Hannover, Germany, and received his Ph.D. from the University of Düsseldorf in 1986. He spent more than ten years in fundamental research specializing in plant biochemistry. For the last 22 years, Detlev’s focus has been on knowledge transfer regarding photosynthetic processes and algal pigments.

Best Way to Perform Light Response Curves?
The right protocol depends on the information you’re looking for! | 10.15.20

Presented by James Bunce, Ph.D.

What important factors should you consider when purchasing a leaf gas exchange system? Find out more about the popular CIRAS-3, the fastest, most accurate portable photosynthesis system on the market for high-level research.

About Dr. Bunce

Dr. James Bunce built his first photosynthesis system as a graduate student 48 years ago and has been performing leaf gas exchange measurements ever since.

He has 40 years of research experience with the USDA Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville, Maryland as an environmental plant physiologist. His focus has been on photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and plant water relations and their response and acclimation, in the context of plant adaptation to the environment, most recently adaptation to the global change factors of rising carbon dioxide concentration and temperature.

Small System Volume: Size Does Matter. | 09.16.20

Presented by Sinisha Ivans, Ph.D.

What important factors should you consider when purchasing a leaf gas exchange system? Find out more about the popular CIRAS-3, the fastest, most accurate portable photosynthesis system on the market for high-level research.

About Sinisha Ivans

Sinisha Ivans is a Technical Sales Engineer at PP Systems, Inc. He provides high-level technical and application-related expertise and support to existing customers. He also focuses on establishing and building relationships with customers worldwide – helping them achieve their research needs. His research interests have included observing closed path systems across the Mountain West to determine water characteristics and CO2 fluxes of sagebrush, as predominant native vegetation of the region. He holds a Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Utah State University.

Red, Green & Blue: Misconceptions About the Photosynthetic Efficacy of Different Light Colors | 07.23.20

Presented by Marc van Iersel, Ph.D.

Because of the relatively low leaf absorptance of green light, it is commonly believed to be inefficient in driving photosynthesis. Dr. Marc van Iersel, from the University of Georgia, will discuss how A/Ci and light-response curves were used to develop a more nuanced understanding of the interactive effects of light intensity and color with regard to photosynthesis.

About Dr. van Iersel

Dr. Marc van Iersel has been with the University of Georgia’s Department of Horticulture since 1995, where he now holds the Dooley professorship.

His research focuses on cost-effective supplemental lighting technologies in greenhouses and vertical farms.

He is the director of project LAMP, a $5M, US-based research project that brings together plant scientists, engineers, and economists to develop profitable supplemental lighting strategies.

In 2017, he co-founded Candidus, Inc. to help bring novel lighting strategies to the greenhouse industry.

Dr. van Iersel has published 130+ scientific papers and has given invited lectures about his research around the world, including in Italy, Spain, Taiwan, Kenya, Canada, Chile, and Brazil.

What, Why & How: A/Ci? | 06.24.20

Presented by James Bunce, Ph.D.

Learn the purpose of performing non-steady-state A (Assimilation) vs. CI (Intercellular CO2) curves and how to perform and process them quickly.

About Dr. Bunce

Dr. James Bunce built his first photosynthesis system as a graduate student 48 years ago and has been performing leaf gas exchange measurements, including many A/Ci curves ever since.

He has 40 years of research experience with the USDA Agricultural Research Service in Beltsville, Maryland as an environmental plant physiologist.  His focus has been on photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and plant water relations and their response and acclimation, in the context of plant adaptation to the environment, most recently adaptation to the global change factors of rising carbon dioxide concentration and temperature.

He has recently published two research papers utilizing the technology and technique presented in this webinar: Three Methods of Estimating Mesophyll Conductance Agree Regarding its CO2 Sensitivity in the Rubisco-Limited Ci Range and Variation in Responses of Photosynthesis and Apparent Rubisco Kinetics to Temperature in Three Soybean Cultivars.