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Measurement of CO2 from the Space Needle in Seattle, WA

On February 15, 2010, NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in collaboration with the Pacific Science Center and Seattle’s Space Needle, installed the WMA-4 CO2 Gas Analyzer to measure how much CO2 is in the air over Seattle, Washington (USA).  There are two air intakes located on the space Needle.  The lower intake is located 300 feet above street level, and the upper intake is located at the very top of the needle.  These intakes bring the air through the tubes into the shack at the top of the needle.  To learn more, click on http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/co2/story/Space+Needle and click on The Method over to the left for more specifics on the WMA-4 deployment and sampling. Thank you to Dr. Christopher Sabine (NOAA/PMEL) and his colleagues for the pictures and reports from Seattle.

If you would like to learn more about this exciting research, please contact PP Systems.

Measurement of CO2 from the Seattle Space Needle

Measuring CO2 in Hospitals in Chicago, Illinois (USA)

The SBA-5 CO2 Gas Analyzer is assisting researchers in Chicago, IL that are measuring a variety of building science parameters including CO2 that may ultimately be used to explain some of the differences in microbial communities observed inside a new hospital as it becomes occupied and operated for an entire year.  To learn more about this exciting project, click on our Application Note or visit the Hospital Microbiome Project directly.  To review the publication associated with this article, click here.

Thank you to Dr. Brent Stephens ( Illinois Institute of Technology, Dept. of civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering) for the pictures and information contained in this application note.

Click here for more information on the SBA-5.  If you would like to learn more about this exciting research, please contact PP Systems.

For application notes on PP Systems’ products, click Application Notes.

SBA-5 CO2 analyzers

Optical Sampling in Antarctica with the UniSpec-DC

Researchers from a terrestrial ecology group (Systems Ecology Group, Univ. of Texas-El Paso), part of the IPY-ROAM expedition, recently visited Antarctica for a large series of measurements using the PP Systems UniSpec-DC Spectral Analysis System.  The main purpose of the research was to address the question about the dependency of terrestrial ecosystems in Antarctica on the nutrient flow from the oceans.  Vegetation reflectance measurements were made at many sites including Barrientos Island, Half Moon Island, Whaler’s Bay, Telefon Bay, Cuverville Island and Petermann Island.  As expected, the weather conditions were quite harsh with temperatures ranging from 0-5o C and %RH ranging from 66-93%.  Cloud cover was more than 80% at all field sites.

During this trip, researchers were able to obtain a rapid assessment of the antarctic shore-based ecosystem based on reflectance data obtained with the UniSpec-DC.  They tried to correlate the reflectance properties of the landcover to other parameters such as vegetation cover, number of nesting penguin pairs close to the sampling site as well as other micromet data.  Thank you to Santonu Goswami (Univ. of Texas-El Paso) and his colleagues for the pictures and reports from this most beautiful place.

Click here for more information on the UniSpec-DC. 

If you would like to learn more about this exciting research, please contact PP Systems.

Measurement of vegetation reflectance in Antarctica with UniSpec-DC Spectral Analysis System